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Dyskusja EPALE: Sztuczna inteligencja a edukacja dorosłych

Sztuczna inteligencja w edukacji dorosłych: pomoc czy przeszkoda dla dorosłych słuchaczy?

Sesję otwierającą będzie można obejrzeć na żywo 24 listopada 2021 r. o godz. 10.00.

Sesję zamykającą będzie można obejrzeć na żywo 24 listopada 2021 r. o godz. 15.30.

Sztuczna inteligencja (AI – ang. artificial intelligence) jest zachwalana jako środek, który może pomóc edukatorom lepiej zrozumieć zasoby wiedzy słuchaczy i zapewnić zindywidualizowane podejście do każdego z nich, dostosowane do konkretnych potrzeb. W bardziej eksperymentalnych ujęciach przewiduje się wykorzystanie robotów w celu uzupełnienia lub zastąpienia pracy edukatora. Jaką rolę AI może odegrać w edukacji dorosłych w przyszłości i czy zmieni ona sposób, w jaki pracujemy z osobami dorosłymi?

W środę 24 listopada 2021 r., między godz. 10.00 a 16.00, na EPALE odbędzie się transmitowana na żywo dyskusja na temat sztucznej inteligencji w edukacji dorosłych.

Wprowadzeniem do pisemnej dyskusji będzie prezentacja na żywo, którą przedstawi Wayne Holmes, doradca UNESCO ds. sztucznej inteligencji i wykładowca w dziedzinie nauk o uczeniu się i innowacji z Institute of Education, University College London. Przeanalizuje on kwestię roli AI w edukacji dorosłych: czy jest ona pomocą czy przeszkodą dla dorosłych słuchaczy?

Po zakończeniu pisemnej dyskusji ekspert podsumuje kluczowe punkty poruszone w ramach drugiej sesji transmitowanej na żywo o godz. 15.30.

Dyskusja obejmie następujące tematy:

  • W jaki sposób AI może wzmocnić edukację dorosłych?
  • Jak możemy sprawić, że AI nie ograniczy się jedynie do zautomatyzowania nieskutecznych rozwiązań pedagogicznych, ale pozwolić stworzyć naprawdę innowacyjne podejścia w edukacji dorosłych?
  • Jak możemy zapewnić etyczność wykorzystania AI w edukacji dorosłych? Jakie kwestie należy uwzględnić i w jaki sposób powinniśmy to zrobić?

Możliwość komentowania już jest dostępna, więc zachęcamy do dzielenia się swoimi przemyśleniami i wskazówkami.

 

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The ethics involved in the Data Collection for AI is a major consideration.

How do we ensure that the use of AI in Adult Education is ethical?

What ethical issues do we need to address and how should we address them? 

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In the process of teaching, AI has become more important mainly as a supportive, supplementary force and as such, professionals in adult education mostly look at it this way.

However, the situation might change and probably will change in the near future. I am not saying that the very profession of the trainer or teacher would be replaced by a software robot but it is very difficult to project the capabilities of technology since it needs to accept new paradigms which are not implemented yet.  When we look at education in its broader sense, informal learning, digital learning etc we already see a massive implementation of AI. People tend to absorb a huge quantity of information and even skills via social networks like Facebook etc and we all know there is a heavy implementation of AI there. What information sources we see on Google, what articles, including educational sources, we see on social media and networks very much depends on AI and its use in filtering and accessing information. And there are so many people who – in their learning environments – use social networks and media as the main information source and even educational source. I expect – with the arrival of Metaverse and other virtual platform that will substitute and upgrade existing social networks in the future – this trend will be much more intensive and we may see a complete revolution in the use of AI in education. It is a broad and vastly speculative discussion though.

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yes it is Martin, hugely speculative as you say, but interesting. However, in my opinion, educators have a duty to their students to help them understand how the AI world works so they can make critical use of it on not be used by it.  This is a reslly important and often overlooked aspect of these new forms information delivery

 

 

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Hi Martin, thanks for your comments. You write: "In the process of teaching, AI has become more important mainly as a supportive, supplementary force." Do you have examples of this? Thanks. 

I never say never, but I certainly don't look forward with any pleasure to Facebook's Metaverse approach. Mr Zuckerberg simply has no idea (other than how to make money - which is a skill I'd like to learn. ;-)

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Hi Wayne, good point from you. Well , as for examples, there is one we made in the EPALE project recently. In an e-learning kit for teachers and trainers, we used a kind of a chatbot which is able to answer a lot of questions from our participants and we used some AI so that many of the answers are not just "yes, education is important". :-) It is  obviously not an entity you would spend a great night with or a good trainer to cover your needs, but it could help a bit. 

 

I don´t have the skill to make money either so you are not alone in it :-) 

Whatever Mr Zuckerberg will come up with, I am sure he won´t be alone. I think it will be a new reality we will have to get used to. It will pose a lot of dangers for our society and it will also bring some benefits too. Just like Facebook or Instagram. Just like the fire for our ancestors - great boost and danger too :-)

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I agree that chatbots can be useful, depending on how and where they are used. If you could send me any information, I'd be very interested to read about your project.

Your fire/Facebook metaphor is great too. But fire isn't owned by a small number of Silicon Valley people... ;-)

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Smart reply :-)

Yes, Mr. Zuckerberg doesn´t own fire. Not even in Silicon Valley if I am not mistaken. He would do it right away if possible.

That´s why he is going to create Metaverse. Because he will certainly own all fires there :-))

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Artificial Intelligence will also change the role of the educator. In principle, this is the only way to automate education and provide recipients with dedicated content. Artificial Intelligence can support not only the selection of content to the needs of the user. It can also support content creation, translation and adaptation to international needs.

I really want AI tools and research on this subject not to be confined within the work of scientists or universities only. The more companies start using AI and the more startups that are created, the better. Useful AI tools will be created faster and more efficiently, even if there are not many of them at the moment.

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I think there will be an increasing curator role for educators in choosing the appropriate AI tool and indeed working with the developers as you say. The introduction of start ups, small developers etc is to be recommended with  more open source solutions to break the monopoly of the large commercial players

But like everything AI will remain a tool and the social element of learning will remain

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You write: "this is the only way to automate education and provide recipients with dedicated content." However, as I've previously mentioned, why do you focus on content? Education is so much more than content. And we have the Internet for that. But more importantly, why do you want to automate education? This might be useful in limited circumstances, for independent learners who have no access to educators, but for me it fundamentally misunderstands what education is. Sorry that I have to disagree.

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How do we ensure that AI doesn’t just automate poor pedagogic practices, but creates genuinely innovative Adult Education practices?

Dr Holmes in his article stresses that in its current state AI tools concentrate on very basic pedagogic practice such a repetition/reward, and does not address high order learning. So how can we, as educators  ensure that real innovation can happen?

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For some time now, not only in adult education, but also in the education sector in general, the topic of future skills has become more relevant - so far skills like decision competence, ambiguity competence, digital literacy, sense-making, reflective competence, design-thinking competence, systems competence and few more have been identified. It makes one wonder what changes are expected in the educational system, how employers (enterprises and organizations) can influence the future demand and requirement of these skills and how the traditional roles of learners and teachers are changing and transforming. Can artificial intelligence be involved and help in this process?

I would say that AI can help. The teacher / educator is already increasingly taking on the role of facilitator and both pupils and adults are learning to learn, to guide the educational process independently. I would also agree with the previous opinions raised that artificial intelligence should not be seen as a substitute for an educator - there will always be different target audiences, different learning objectives. At the same time, it offers more opportunities for those who want to learn, allowing them to choose the most appropriate training format (whether it is online AI-led training or face-to-face / online tutor-led lessons).

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This is a really important point Inguna so far skills like decision competence, ambiguity competence, digital literacy, sense-making, reflective competence, design-thinking competence, systems competence and few more have been identified. It makes one wonder what changes are expected in the educational system, how employers (enterprises and organizations) can influence the future demand and requirement of these skills and how the traditional roles of learners and teachers are changing and transforming. Can artificial intelligence be involved and help in this process?

I believe it is doubtful at this point in time if AI is sophisticated enough to work on the higher level skills that some of these competencies require but the question of how educators and educational organisations can influence the types of AI tools to assist in the process is an interesting one

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Absolutely, Anne, artificial intelligence is currently unable to fully help to develop at least some of listed future skills, further demonstrating that human beings are at the heart of learning - AI should be seen as an additional "tool" that we are still discovering, learning about and trying to understand its actual contribution or weaknesses.

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AI really offers a wide range of opportunities,but I think it will never be able to substitute a contemporary adult educator.AI is not a threat for teachers and adult educators,it can urge the teachers and adult educators to devote more time for self development,to become  more professional in teaching and learning methodology.

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I don't think the teaching profession is one of the most threatened by artificial intelligence.Artificial intelligence is also dynamically entering the field of adult education and vocational education and training, through the various self-learning opportunities

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I agree the teaching profession is not under treat, however we do as educators need to be vigilant about AI. AI depends on data gathering, how this is done and to what end is where the real challenges lie

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I agree education in not under any threat by the development of AI.  I believe AI will provide educators with authentic data which will pave the way for project-based learning experiences.  I think this will also affect the pedagogical approaches of the future, that is the blending of the virtual with the real world.  

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Quando grandi gruppi come Facebook, Google e Microsoft, cominciano a volgere lo sguardo verso la "realtà virtuale" e il "metaverso", da un punto di vista didattico e scolastico, credo che occorra cominciare a studiare e approfondire il fenomeno che certamente porterà, nel volgere di qualche anno, una nuova rivoluzione (o semplicemente una particolare evoluzione innovativa) con riflessi importanti nella quotidianità.

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I remember a decade ago attempting, along with many other educators and researchers, to use Second Life to support teaching and learning. But it simply didn't work (I mean the technology did what it said it did, it just was not as interesting or useful as everyone claimed it would be). Very little teaching or learning took place. Now, apart from slicker graphics, and more complexity, I currently don't understand what Meta will bring to teaching and learning. Personally, I hope it's Facebook's undoing. ;-) BTW I'm not against all AI. Like a typical Englishman, I only speak English (apologies!), so to understand your post I used Google Translate!

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I don't think the teaching profession is one of the most threatened by artificial intelligence. I think teachers will have to change, to take on other roles. They will be pushed to do what, in my understanding, corresponds to teaching. In other words, they will be the facilitators of the learning that each person will be able to do for themselves. And that, for me, will be a positive step forward that will favor learning and that can lead to better learning.

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I think the role of facilitator comes with the change of pedagogical practice in the move to more hybrid models of teaching and learning. But these do not necessarily use AI. AI measures our preferences, our keystrokes, our like and dislikes and analyses the patterns in order to offer us what we like... But sometimes the role of the teacher is to challenges us out of our comfort zones....

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I agree with you that AI is not capable of taking on the role of the teacher... but that's not the claim that many AI in education companies make, and is not understood by many policymakers. So, for me, we have to pay careful attention. Let's use AI, but let's use it to empower teachers (not replace them) and to enhance student agency (not to spoon feed them).

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The Unesco Social and Human Sciences Commission has approved the DRAFT TEXT OF THE RECOMMENDATION ON THE ETHICS OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. It contains chapter dedicated to AI in education „POLICY AREA 8: EDUCATION AND RESEARCH“:

  • Member States should work with international organizations, educational institutions and private and non-governmental entities to provide adequate AI literacy education,......
  • promote the acquisition of “prerequisite skills” for AI education, such as basic literacy, numeracy, coding and digital skills, and media and information literacy, as well as critical and creative thinking, teamwork, communication, socio-emotional and AI ethics skills, especially in countries and in regions or areas within countries where there are notable gaps in the education of these skills.
  • promote general awareness programmes about AI developments, including on data and the opportunities and challenges brought about by AI technologies, the impact of AI systems on human rights and their implications, including children’s rights. These programmes should be accessible to non-technical as well as technical groups.
  • Member States should encourage research initiatives on the responsible and ethical use of AI technologies in teaching, teacher training and e-learning, among other issues, to enhance opportunities and mitigate the challenges and risks involved in this area. The initiatives should be accompanied by an adequate assessment of the quality of education and impact on students and teachers of the use of AI technologies........
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Thank you for sharing. As you'll see these principles are all about learning about AI, and are for that all very important. But they don't cover learning with AI - using AI tools in adult education. UNESCO are hopefully now going to be looking in more detail at the ethics of AI and education. There is also an EU expert group working on this area. I'm looking forward to seeing the outcomes of both.

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Artificial Intelligence applications (robotics etc) are replacing many professions that require few skills and pose a threat even to professions that require specialisation.

Artificial intelligence is also dynamically entering the field of adult education and vocational education and training, through the various self-learning opportunities that someone can find in the multiple MOOCS, platforms like Udemy, Skillshare, Udacity, Coursera, as well as applications like you've mentioned (Duolingo and others). AI will soon (if not already) enable the collection of data on user/learner's behaviour during learning, assessment, and more that were never available in the past.

Is AI changing the nature of Adult Education and that of the Adult Educator/VET Educator? Do you see the future of Adult Educators transforming to that of a researcher/developer and out of the traditional classroom?

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Is AI changing the nature of Adult Education and that of the Adult Educator/VET Educator? Do you see the future of Adult Educators transforming to that of a researcher/developer and out of the traditional classroom?

 

This is a really interesting question and I am sure Dr Holmes will come back on this, I  personally am not sure that AI will change the nature of the Adult/VET educator but the whole question of being a researcher is one that has possibilities. As DR Holmes pointed out in his article, the AI developers can develop relevant AI tools when they understand the nature of the problem, but they have to be told the problems. This is where the research can be useful for adult educators

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If we, as educators, allow AI companies to embed their products in adult education, then yes - it is likely that AI will change the nature of adult and VET education, and probably not for the better. Instead, as Anne mentions, we need educators to identify the real problems, for which the computer scientists use their AI expertise to address. If that happens, perhaps adult education will develop in interesting ways, but with human educators and human students retaining the control.

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Why don't education systems invest, for example, in adjusting qualifications to the needs of the labour market or in defining the educational supply network in each territory with the support of Artificial Intelligence? It seems to me that it would be very useful.

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Personally, I'm not keen on education being determined by the labour market. While for some people, AI might mean they need to retrain (if their job is automated out of existence), and so need new courses and new qualifications, for many adult learners it's about far more than preparing for jobs. We must not forget those who wish to develop their individual potential independently of work. Having said that, here's an example of an AI company that's helping identify skill needs: https://headai.com/

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Thanks professor for a good example. May be somebody else could give  such practical examples already? May be it would be useful on the level of EPALE to summarize such practical experiences to learn from them ,to encourage educators to learn more about AI and its significance in education.

 

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The reality is that so far AI is not used in those subjects, probably because it isn't capable. But I do think teachers in those subjects should, as a part of their teaching, consider the impact of AI on their domain. For example, the AI system known as GPT-3 can generate text that looks like poetry. I think it would be great if literature/poetry teachers were to use those text to consider questions around what it means to be human.

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Welcome to this new EPALE online discussion!

Get ready to meet Dr. Wayne Holmes, UNESCO Consultant on AI and Education and Lecturer on Learning Sciences and Innovation, Institute of Education, University College London.

You are welcome to start commenting and sharing your views, as Dora and Ingrida already did! They can live-streamed and commented by the expert.

Claudia (EPALE Moderator)

 

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The leading contradiction in education is the contradiction between the ever-increasing amount of knowledge and the limited time available for a person to acquire that knowledge. Each method tries to resolve this contradiction in its own way. From this point of view, artificial intelligence makes a good contribution by expanding the availability of knowledge to a wide range of students and the different ways in which this knowledge can be acquired. Artificial intelligence challenges the development of self-directed learning skills and will lead to effective learning and effective thinking strategies. Artificial intelligence has become more active in education at a time of serious transformation of the education system. The education system is moving from its institutional set-up to an educational ecosystem format in which a group of different actors established for a specific learning purpose uses a complex of formal, non-formal and informal learning resources. Artificial intelligence is well placed to support the functioning of such educational ecosystems.

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As I mentioned earlier, I fear that we focus too much on knowledge, and ignore the other more important and challenging areas of education - such as criticality, creativity, collaboration and so on. And the problem is that AI, or at least the AI tools that exist today and are likely to exist in the near future, focus almost exclusively on knowledge transmission. In so doing they typically automate poor pedagogic practices. Where is the innovative approaches to teaching and learning brought by AI? I also echo the Ivanova's question. We have two communities - computer scientists and adult educators, and the problem is that they speak two languages. Computer scientists are not experts in teaching and learning, while adult educators are not experts in AI. So we need more conversations like this one, to facilitate the development of innovative approaches that address real adult education problems.

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Artificial intelligence is changing the way we live, work and learn.

Artificial intelligence is a great challenge but also an unprecedented opportunity to achieve the essence of lifelong learning that we have advocated so much since the year 2000. AI will effectively enable us to learn anywhere, anytime, at our pace and respecting the way each one of us learns best. It can be used to deepen knowledge about how to provide better individual learning to each adult learner, making learning more meaningful and motivating.

AI can also be a driver for teachers to stop being emitters of content and become assistants to learners. Learners can thus be driven to discover knowledge by themselves. This is critical for learners to learn to learn throughout their lives, thus being able to face the transitions that result from green and digital transitions.

The biggest challenge involves being able to manage the entry of artificial intelligence into our lives while maintaining the respect and supremacy of Humanity.

 

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