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Commission publishes practical guide to promoting adult learning in the workplace

Member State experts worked the last 2 years on understanding better what can be done to promote adult learning in the workplace. This was facilitated by the European Commission in the framework of the ET2020 Working group on Adult Learning.

The final report of their work is now available.

It became a practical report meant to inspire stakeholders, whether they are a governmental organisation, an enterprise, a trade union, a training provider, civil society, or adult learning professional.

The report discusses what adult learning in the workplace is; why it is important to promote adult learning in the workplace; and what can be done to promote it. It also contains illustrative descriptions of policies from the Member States.

How to stimulate adult learning in the workplace

The report identified 10 building blocks on how to stimulate adult learning in the workplace:

  1. Encourage employers to adopt a learning culture that supports career-long learning
  2. Ensures that adult learning in the workplace puts learners on a lifelong learning pathway (and is supported by guidance systems and validation of prior leaning)
  3. Secure the long-term commitment of all stakeholders
  4. Ensure effective coordination between all stakeholders and agree on roles and responsibilities
  5. Communication about adult learning in the workplace using the language of those needed to be encouraged
  6. Ensure sustainable co-funding systems in which all see the benefit of investing in adult learning in the workplace
  7. Ensure that workplace learning is tailored to adult learners' needs
  8. Ensure that adult learning in the workplace responds to employers' needs
  9. Assure the quality of adult learning in the workplace
  10. Set up effective monitoring and evaluation systems to ensure that adult learning in the workplace remains relevant and effective

Read the full report

Community of Practice on EPALE

On EPALE, we continue the work of the Adult Learning Working Group to further exchange policy examples in relation to the above-mentioned building blocks. If you are interested in exchanging your views with peers on adult learning in the workplace, join the Community of Practice on this issue.

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