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Realisation of the programme's goals – Youth Adults' Skills in Finland

06/04/2016
by Erno HYVÖNEN
Language: EN
Document available also in: FI

The quantitative goals of the Young Adults' Skills Programme were set at about 4,000 new students/year, 1,500/year of whom would begin their studies in apprenticeship-type training. It was not until the end of the summer holiday that the programme truly kicked off in 2013.

By 20 September 2015, 9,160 students had started studies in an educational institute (situation 16 October 2015) and 785 students had started an apprenticeship[1]. Therefore, the programme has reached its goal of 4,000 new students/year after 2.5 years of operation. Thus, it is safe to say that the Young Adults' Skills Programme has achieved its quantitative goals.

2013–2014

vocational upper secondary education

preparatory training for a vocational qualification

preparatory training for a specialist vocational qualification

total

new students

2,050

3,247

26

5,323

degrees

71

364

9

444

parts of degrees

300

1,128

2

1,430

Table 1: New students, completed degrees, and parts of degrees in educational institutes 20 September 2014 (information from 56/60 institutes)

2015

vocational upper secondary education

preparatory training for a vocational qualification

preparatory training for a specialist vocational qualification

total

new students

2,745

1,072

20

3,837

degrees

223

401

7

631

parts of degrees

1,717

906

7

2,630

Table 2: New students, completed degrees, and parts of degrees in educational institutes 21 September 2014–20 September 2015 (situation 16 October 2015)

Total

vocational upper secondary education

preparatory training for a vocational qualification

preparatory training for a specialist vocational qualification

total

new students

4,795

4,319

46

9,160

degrees

294

765

16

1,075

parts of degrees

2,017

2,034

9

3,060

Table 3: New students, completed degrees, and parts of degrees in educational institutes throughout the NAO programme (situation 16 October 2015)

In the current economic situation, apprenticeship-type training has clearly fallen behind in its quantitative goals (slightly over half of the 2015 goals reached). However, educational institute-type training has successfully mended the situation. During 2015, educational institutes would have gained an even larger number of new students in NAO positions, but many organisers had to transfer NAO-eligible students to VOS positions as they were not able to fill their basic education positions.

Education leading to specialist vocational qualifications has clearly been too challenging for a large number of NAO students, but enabling basic vocational education as NAO education as of the beginning of 2014 seems to be a successful solution; their share among new students was only 39 % on 20 September 2014, but the number rose to 72 % among the next year's new students. Among those who completed a degree, the share of basic degrees increased from 16 % to 35 % in one year.  The evidently smaller share of those who completed a basic degree is due to the fact that the preparatory training for basic degrees was not possible as an educational institute-type training in the programme until the beginning of 2014. Tables 1–3 present the statistical information from two different years separately and together.

The Young Adults' Skills Programme also had a positive qualitative outcome. Of all the new students, slightly more than 40 % have been unemployed and just under 40 % have been unemployed long-term or at risk of marginalisation, whereas the share of employed people in the target group is more than 60 %. Therefore, the programme is successful in finding uneducated young adults with the most challenging situations. The share of men among all the new students has risen to over 50 %, whereas about 60 % of the people in the target group are men. The share of non-Finnish speakers among the new students has risen to 18 %, whereas they account for one quarter of the people in the target group. The information is based on executor surveys carried out on five different calculation dates.

No reliable information on dropout rates is available as of yet.

Read next Realisation of the programme's goals – The Improving the competence of adults programme

About the writer

Erno Hyvönen is a project planner of the Young adults’ skills and Improving the competence of adults programmes at the Ministry for Education and Culture. His duties include monitoring the results of programmes, supporting the institutions carrying out the programmes as well as sharing the programme results.

Links to the other blogs about the Young Adults' Skills Programme in Finland:

 

[1] Apprenticeship positions are year-round full positions; the actual number of new students (e.g. in parts of degrees) is larger

 

 

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